Wednesday

Running product review: Vim and Vigr compression socks




A great pair of compression socks can quickly become a runner’s best friend, especially after a long race when one’s calves, ankles, and feet may be swollen and sore. By encouraging circulation and energizing the legs, this health-based hosiery is a go-to recovery tool for lots of athletes. That’s why I was pleased to test out a couple of pairs of sporty compression socks from Vim & Vigr of Missoula, Montana.

These knee-high compression socks come in all sorts of interesting colors and patterns: argyle, fair isle, fun stripes, nautical stripes, polka dots, and solid black. These designs are actually attractive and stylish enough to wear to work or every day, even with skirts or sporty dresses.

Sizes, which correspond to US numbered shoe sizes, include small (5-7), medium (7.5-9.5), and large (10-12). Fabric content for the cotton socks includes 50 percent, cotton, 20 percent nylon, 18 percent rubber, and 12 percent spandex. For the nylon socks, the fabric content is 88 percent nylon and 12 percent spandex. The knit weave offers a 15-20 mmHg compression level. A few styles come with a 20-30 mmHg compression level. 



How do Vim & Vigr compression socks measure up to real wearing?

After trying both the cotton and the nylon varieties of Vim & Vigr compression socks, I began wondering about the sizing. The cotton pair fit nicely, even offering a bit of extra stretch for longer-lasting comfort. The nylon pair was extra snug, even though my actual size is a whole step lower than the sock size I tried. The nylon compression socks were not actually knee high, which was somewhat disappointing. These socks were at least two inches too short, even for a shorter person like me. They repeatedly slipped down on my calves. This was a bothersome, and I have to wonder how a taller person would fare. The cotton socks stretched all the way up to the knee and stayed there, as expected. Best of all, they fit beautifully under tall boots.

The engineered fabric knit of these socks does offer excellent comfort and support, and it’s breathable. The reinforced-knit toe cap adds to a better foot fit as well. They do take a little effort to put on, tugging them up a little at a time, sort of like nylon stockings. But once they are on, these socks are incredibly soothing to run-tired feet.

Vim&Vigor Compression Socks retail for $30 to nearly $40 per pair (for the women’s socks), depending upon vendors and special offers. Moisture-wick nylon, wool, and wide calf collections are available as well. The company also offers compression tights, men’s compression socks, and unisex compression calf sleeves.


This product reviewer received a free sample of the product described and evaluated here, although the reviewer has no prior or existing relationship (either familial or professional) with the creator, manufacturer or marketer of the product.


Overall, I found these compression socks to be comfortable, soothing, and suitable for post-race recovery and traveling. My two pairs have stood up well to machine laundering in cold water, although I do not put them in the dryer. (That also prevents the mysterious one-lost-sock problem in the laundry.)

Vim & Vigr compression socks could also be useful for diabetics, pregnant women, those recovering from surgery, or anyone who must remain standing (or even seated) for long periods of time. Besides runners, Vim & Vigr compression socks might be just the ticket for bartenders, beauticians, cashiers, chefs, coaches, construction workers, doctors, flight attendants, horse trainers, mail carriers, nurses, pharmacists, retail clerks, teachers, theater ushers, tour guides, wait staffers, and others who work on their feet.

Plus, the compression socks are supposed to help prevent varicose and spider veins. And they come with a 30-day money-back guarantee.

Did I mention I am now hiding my Vim & Vigr compression socks, so they don’t run away mysteriously from my sock drawer? (Yes, that tends to happen in my house.)


NOTE: Written by this author, this copyrighted material originally appeared on another publisher’s site. That site no longer exists. This author holds all rights to this content. No republication is allowed without permission.

 
Image:
Product photo/s by LAN/Runderdog
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